Sexuality vs. Sexual Identity

August 12, 2016

 

The word sexuality was first defined in 1789, according to dictionary.com, as the act or fact of being sexual. In 1789, it changed to the capability of sexual feelings. And in 1980 we have what we commonly think of when we think about sexuality, it was defined as sexual identity.

 

We went from fact to feelings to identity. We went from objective to subjective. We went from absolute truth to circumstantial truth. Many people look at this and see this as triumph of our society—to truly understand that sexuality is not a blanket idea but a very individual idea. It’s not.

Like I sated in my previous post, it is a blanket idea and it is NOT an individual idea.

 

Here’s what I mean. The fact that we are sexual beings is not up for debate. We are, and were created, as sexual beings. We have the capacity to be sexual. We have the ability to mate. Every living thing on this planet reproduces and that is a byproduct of sexuality, real clear and simple.

Only plants can be asexual, meaning reproduce alone. Animals are only heterosexual because you need male and female to reproduce. Okay so I know you’re not going to argue there and we must be on the same page. If we’re not, maybe we need to revisit high school biology.

 

Moving right along, simply stated sexuality—being sexual—does not mean the same thing as sexual identity because my ability to be sexual does not change but my “sexual identity” is subject to feelings and beliefs. Whether or not you are heterosexually, homosexually, bi SEXUALly identified—you are a sexual being regardless. The phrase that stays the same is sexual, right?

My race does not determine if I’m a human or not. So my sexual identity does not determine if I’m a sexual being or not.

 

Time for Change Queens,

Yeamah

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